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Comment Archives: stories: Special Sections: Women and Weed

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

I am the owner of this image and would like the image removed. I am trying to enhance my professional identity across the net, and would greatly appreciate it.

1 like, 1 dislike
Posted by Dana Marie Ocker on 08/27/2013 at 11:17 PM

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

NORML needs to replace the money racket lawyers pretending to care about marijuana legalization in Georgia, most particularly in Gwinnett County.

Posted by Jose Gonzales on 07/23/2013 at 9:58 PM

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

We need a comprehensive survey undertaken to determine by what extent the profits of gas stations, supermarkets, pharmacies and liquor stores will increase by if they were allowed to legally sell marijuana to adults. When these large, reputable corporations see what they're missing out on they may feel very motivated to demand that adult marijuana sales be legalized!

Marijuana has repeatedly been proven to NOT cause cancer, heart disease, brain damage, liver disease, emphysema, or any other significant health issue, and its addiction potential is about on par with coffee. In all respects, marijuana is far safer than beer and wine and should, at the very least, be controlled by exactly the same laws that we use for alcohol.

Our current marijuana prohibition empowers drug dealers and the Mexican drug cartels by preventing any form of legal competition to their activities. Instead of protecting children from marijuana, these laws create an environment of zero legal supply amidst massive and unrelenting demand and effectively serve to make our children LESS safe. It is *because* of the failings of the prohibition that our children now have easier access to marijuana than to alcohol! Our communities need legal adult marijuana sales for exactly the same reason that they need legal alcohol and tobacco sales - to keep unscrupulous black-market criminals away from our neighborhoods and our children.

Parents work hard to keep drugs away from their children and they need effective, logic-based laws to help them with this. In order to greatly improve the safety of our children we need legal adult marijuana sales in gas stations and supermarkets at prices too low for drug dealers to match - just as beer and wine are sold today. Our laws must be based on logic, fact and reason, and NOT on ideological positions and unprovable assumptions!

3 likes, 0 dislikes
Posted by jway on 03/27/2011 at 11:59 PM

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

In agenda item before the Georgia Composite Medical Board in the October meeting the decision that 'no demonstrated need' for the Patient Qualification Review Board is needed as required by law.


O.C.G.A. § 43-34-122 (2010)

§ 43-34-122. Definitions


As used in this article, the term:

(1) "Board" means the Georgia Composite Medical Board.

(2) "Marijuana" means marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol, as defined or listed in Article 2 of Chapter 13 of Title 16.

(3) "Physician" means a person licensed to practice medicine pursuant to Article 2 of this chapter.

(4) "Program" means the Controlled Substances Therapeutic Research Program established pursuant to Code Section 43-34-123.

(5) "Review board" means the Patient Qualification Review Board established pursuant to Code Section 43-34-124.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-903A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 1982, p. 3, § 43; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.

O.C.G.A. § 43-34-123 (2010)

§ 43-34-123. Controlled Substances Therapeutic Research Program

(a) There is established under the Georgia Composite Medical Board the Controlled Substances Therapeutic Research Program, which shall be administered by the board. Under the program, the board shall act as a sponsor of state-wide investigational studies, utilizing as drug investigators individual physicians who elect to participate in accordance with the guidelines and protocols developed by the board. Such guidelines and protocols shall be designed to ensure that stringent security and record-keeping requirements for research drugs are met and that participants in the program meet those research standards necessary to establish empirical bases for the evaluation of marijuana as a medically recognized therapeutic substance. The board shall promulgate such rules and regulations as it deems necessary or advisable to administer the program. In promulgating such guidelines, protocols, rules, and regulations, the board shall take into consideration those pertinent rules and regulations promulgated by the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency, the Food and Drug Administration, and the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

(b) The program shall be limited to patients who are certified to the board by a physician as being:

(1) Cancer patients involved in a life-threatening situation in which treatment by chemotherapy or radiology has produced severe side effects; or

(2) Glaucoma patients who are not responding to conventional controlled substances.

(c) No patient may be admitted to the program without full disclosure by the physician of the experimental nature of the program and of the possible risks and side effects of the proposed treatment.

(d) The cost of any blood test required by the federal Food and Drug Administration prior to entrance into the program shall be paid by the patient seeking entrance into the program.

(e) Only the following persons shall have access to the names and other identifying characteristics of patients in the program for whom marijuana has been prescribed under this article:

(1) The board;

(2) The review board created by Code Section 43-34-124;

(3) The Attorney General or his or her designee;

(4) Any person directly connected with the program who has a legitimate need for the information; and

(5) Any federal agency having responsibility for the program.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-904A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.

O.C.G.A. § 43-34-124 (2010)

§ 43-34-124. Patient Qualification Review Board; members; officers; meetings; duties; exception to open meetings requirements

(a) The board shall appoint the Patient Qualification Review Board. Each member of the review board shall be approved for such membership by a majority vote of the board and shall serve at the pleasure of the board. The review board shall be composed of:

(1) A board certified physician in ophthalmology;

(2) A board certified physician in surgery;

(3) A board certified physician in internal medicine and medical oncology;

(4) A board certified physician in psychiatry;

(5) A board certified physician in radiology; and

(6) A pharmacist licensed under Chapter 4 of Title 26, relating to pharmacists, pharmacy, and drugs.

(b) The review board shall elect from its members a chairperson and a vice chairperson. The review board shall hold regular meetings at least once every 60 days and shall meet at such additional times as shall be called by the chairperson of the review board or the chairperson of the board. Each member of the review board shall receive for services for each day's attendance upon meetings of such board the same amount authorized by law for members of the General Assembly for attendance upon meetings of the General Assembly.

(c) The board shall adopt such rules and regulations as it deems necessary for the performance of the duties of the review board.

(d) The review board shall review all patient applicants for the program and their physicians and shall certify those qualified for participation in the program. The review board shall additionally certify pharmacies which are licensed by the state and which are otherwise qualified and certify physicians regarding the distribution of marijuana pursuant to Code Section 43-34-125. Meetings of the review board to certify patients, physicians, or pharmacies shall not be open to the public, as otherwise required by Chapter 14 of Title 50.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-905A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 2002, p. 415, § 43; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.

O.C.G.A. § 43-34-125 (2010)

§ 43-34-125. Receipt of marijuana by board; distribution; responsibility for costs of obtaining and testing marijuana

(a) The board shall apply to contract with the National Institute on Drug Abuse for receipt of marijuana pursuant to this article and pursuant to regulations promulgated by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency.

(b) The board shall cause marijuana approved for use in the program to be transferred to a certified pharmacy, licensed by the state, for distribution to the certified patient by a licensed pharmacist upon a written order for research medication of the certified physician, pursuant to this article. Any reasonable costs incurred by the board in obtaining or testing marijuana shall be charged to participating physicians who may seek reimbursement from their research subjects utilizing the marijuana.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-906A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.

What happened to this PROGRAM? Here are the Meeting Minutes of the Board from 1980's:

Medical Board Minutes
June, 9-11, 1980

Members of the Patient Qualification Review Board, Dr. Nixon, Dr. Greiner, Dr. Moore, Dr. Silverstein, Dr. Adams and Mr. Clifton joined the meeting for a report on the request for approval of the protocals for the therapuetic use of marijuana. Others present were Selby McCash, Public Relations Representative for the Office of Secretary of State, Noel Mayes of the Georgia Network and Mona Taft.

Mr. Clifton reported that he and Mrs. Taft had just returned from a trip to Washington where they met with officials of the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institute of Drug Abuse and got verbal approval of the protocals by the FDA. Written official approval is expected by July 9th and Boards hope the program will be underway the latter part of August or early September. Mr. Clifton said the FDA requested permission from the Composite State Board of Medical Examiners to use Georgia's protocals as model protocals for other states.

Dr. Thompson made a motion to authorize the PQR Board to send a letter to the FDA granting approval to use Board's protocals. Motion seconded by Dr. Trimble and unaniously passed.

Dr. Nixon expressed an interest in having a member of the PQR Board to meet with the Medical Board at the semi-monthly meetings to give a report on the activities.

Dr. Farris read a letter from Mona Taft thanking the Board for its support of the program.

August 13-14, 1980 with Board Members present on Aug. 13th were:

M. Virginia Tuggle, M.D., President
Bernard J. Bridges, M.D., Vice President
Albert M. Deal, M.D.
J. Duncan Farris, M.D.
J. Watts Lipscomb, M.D.
Bob Maughon, M.D.
William J. Morton, M.D.
John B. O'Neal, III, M.D.
Robert E. Thompson, M.D.
Hassie H. Trimble, Jr., D.O.

others present were:

James E. Anthony, Jr., M.D., Medical Coordinator
Margie K. McBryar, Board Secretary

Michael R. Fowler, Joint Secretary, joined the meeting to discuss a proposed contract for a consultant for the Patient Qualification Review Board (PQR) Board. He indicated the Secretary of State had given verbal approval of the contract.

There was a lengthy discussion of this contract and the duties of the consultant. The Board requested clarification of the duties. Dr. Lipscomb made a motion that C.L. Cliford be Member of the PQR Board, be requested to meet with the Medical Board to provide more information regarding the consultant's activities and duties. Motion was seconded by Dr. Trimble and carried by a majority vote.

The agenda was presented for consideration. Dr. Lipscomb made a motion to approve the agenda with flexibility. Dr. O'Neal seconded the motion which was unanimously passed.

December 1-3, 1980

Mr. Watry reported that the PQR Board voted to allow the contract for Mona Taft to expire December 31st, 1980. Motion seconded by Dr. Maughon and unanimously passed.

He advised that the Drug Enforcement Administration in Atlanta had completed its investigation of 6 hospital pharmacies and the PQR Board is awaiting approva from DEA in Washington to dispense the marijuana and THC capsules.

January 7, 1981

Mr. Watry gave a report on the proposed contract for the statistical analyses of the marijuana research program between the Patient Qualification Review Board and Emory University. He said it had been sent to the Board's attorney for study. He reported that twenty-three patients have been approved to receive the marijuana, but because "red tape" distribution cannot be made, however he anticipated it being shipped.

April 8-9, 1981

The proposed rules for the Controlled Substance Therapuetic Research Program were considered in the afternoon during physician's assistant matters. A letter from William Loga, M.D. ws read in which Dr. Logan requested that the Board include rules for glaucoma patients.

The Board asked that this letter be presented to the Patient Qualification Review Board and requested that Dr. Logan be notified that while the law provides for glaucoma patients, rules cannot be adopted until a protocal has been developed.

Dr. Mammett made a motion that the Board adopt the proposed rules as proposed, Dr. Neuberg seconded the motion and it was unanimously passed.

M. Virginia Tuggle, M.D. President
Michael R. Fowler, Joint Secretary,
State Examaning Boards Approved: June 16, 1981

October 7-8, 1981

Andy Watry reported on changes in the Marijuana Protocal as recommeded by the PQR Board.

change on page 5, Marijuana Protocal, Patient Eligibility, paragraph F:

"Patients with a history of angina and/or cardiovascular problems known to contraindicate the use of THC/marijuana will be ineligible."

change on page 10, Marijuana Protocal, Patient Parameters, paragraph A, number 4:

"EKG, chest x-ray (to be done by the attending physician)

"to be done by the attending physician" was recommended by Louise Leve, M.D., Drug Coordinator for THC of the National Institute of Health.

Dr. Kelley made a motion to change the protocal as recommended. Motion was seconded by Dr. Kennedy and unanimously passed.

The Board discussed the Glaucoma Protocal (previously mailed to Medical Board Members) proposed by the PQR Board. After a brief discussion, Dr. Hammett made a motion that the Medical Board support the Glaucoma Protocal as submitted by the PQR Board and as mandated to this Board (Medical) by the Georgia Legislature inh the Controlled Substance Therapuetic Research Act, Ga. Code Annotated 94-9A, effective February 22, 1980. Dr. Chastain seconded the motion and it was unanimously passed.

Bernard J. Bridges, M.D. President
Michael R. Fowler, Joint Secretary
State Examining Boards approved: December 1, 1981

Who Mona Taft?

Mona Taft on her husband Harris, "One day in 1977, when we arrived at the treatment room where Harris was to receive the injection, he bolted and ran down the corridor. I found him a bit later, wandering the halls. He told me he couldn't take any more chemotherapy. He was at wit's end, exhausted by the disease, terrified by the effects of the drugs that were supposed to prolong his life. I have never before or since seen a man so genuinely and deeply frightened. Harris had come to fear the treatments more than the cancer and, he admitted, more than death itself. He told me he would choose dying over further chemotherapy."

Later Harris tried smoking cannabis before chemotherapy; it completely controlled the vomiting.

"It is impossible for me to adequately describe what a profound difference marijuana made. Before using marijuana, Harris felt ill all the time, could not eat, could not even stand the smell of food cooking. Afterward, he remained active, ate regular meals, and could be himself. His mood, his manner, and his overall outlook were transformed. And of course, marijuana prolonged his life by allowing him to continue chemotherapy. In two years of smoking it, he never had an adverse or untoward reaction. Marijuana was the least dangerous drug my husband recieved during the nine years he was treated for cancer." (Marijuana the Forbidden Medicine, Grinspoon and Bakalar, 1993, reprinted with permission of copyright holders, Yale University Press for use in title The Science of Marijuana by Leslie L. Iversen)

What happened to the records? 'Gone with the wind'

Thank you for submitting your question to GEORGIA ARCHIVES

Question ID: 5933017

Your question:
O.C.G.A. 43-34-123 established under the Georgia Composite State Medical Board of Medical Examiners the Controlled Substances Therapuetic Research Program that was administered by the composite board. This Controlled Substance Therapuetic Research Program began functioning in 1980 through at least Sept. 1982. Dr. Daniel Nixon of Emory was the President. Dr. Anthony was dispensing physician. Bonnie Gregory was the Secretary and is the current Assistant Administrator for the Georgia Drug and Narcotics Agency and these records are not filed with that office. The Georgia Composite Medical State Board of Medical Examiners was under the Secretary of State during that time. The Georgia Composite Medical Board that took its' place does not have the records of the Controlled Substance Therapeudic Research Program. This Program is also called CANCER AND GLYCOMA TREATMENT in the code section that is still in effect. Bonnie Gregory the former secretary is of the opinion that these records must have gone to the State Archives. Please research the location of the records and let me know where they are located and when they are available for review and copy costs. This research is on behalf of the Georgia Composite Medical Board. Also, can a full copy of the records be ordered by the Georgia Composite Medical Board? Who can I direct the Executive staff there to contact for a copy of this file?

You will receive acknowledgement of question receipt and an answer to your question at the e-mail address you provided:
greg@universalorthodox.org

To check the status of your question(s):
http://www.questionpoint.org/crs/servlet/o…
If you've forgotten your password, you'll have an opportunity to e-mail it to yourself.

Thank you for submitting a question to Ask an Archivist. You will receive a reply as soon as possible. Due to budget cuts and the resulting staff reductions, current response time is seven to ten business days.

0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by RightRevGreg on 10/30/2010 at 2:47 PM

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

"Right now, with the Republicans in charge, the outlook isn't good for legalization," says Gwinnett County defense attorney David Clark.

Ummm.....Dave? Dave....?
DAVE'S NOT HERE !!!

Maybe DAVE has been too busy inhaling what he is allegedly defending to note that the DEMOCRAPS have been in office and in charge for the last several years.

In fact, the White House has been under the facist control of the Dummycraps for nearly 2 years now, and the Congress has been under the Nazi Communist Dummycrap regime for the last 6+ years.

Also to note: as quoted in this article, it was a REPUBLICAN and House Leader Newt Gingrich who was pushing for the legalization of medical marijuana, NOT the radical liberal left.

Your arguments are unfounded and poorly researched. You need to read the news once in while. Get out of the house, participate in life. You might be shocked and amazed at the vast amount of factual information that is available, literally at your fingertips.

Or are you too busy using those fingertips to roll another fatty to notice?

2 likes, 5 dislikes
Posted by Pot Smokin' Scot on 08/19/2010 at 7:13 PM

Re: “Working girls

Inspiring!

Posted by MrFishATL on 06/13/2010 at 7:28 PM

Re: “17 things to do high

RESPECT on #16

Posted by Anonymous on 05/23/2010 at 7:47 PM

Re: “Pot legalization in Georgia? Don't hold your breath

From the article: "Right now, with the Republicans in charge, the outlook isn't good for legalization," says Gwinnett County defense attorney David Clark, who serves as executive director of Georgia NORML. "But maybe we could see an effort to allow medical marijuana."

I was very surprised to see that even NORML doesn't know that medical marijuana has been legal in Georgia in a limited program for cancer and glaucoma since 1980.

SOURCE: The Official Code of Georgia, Annotated. (by the way, any time you have a Georgia Law question, look it up here first! Google OCGA, then select the first result -lexisnexis- then search with natural language.)

URL: http://www.lexis-nexis.com/hottopics/gacode/default.asp

TITLE 43. PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESSES
CHAPTER 34. PHYSICIANS, ACUPUNCTURE, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS, CANCER AND GLAUCOMA TREATMENT, RESPIRATORY CARE, CLINICAL PERFUSIONISTS, AND ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS PRACTICE
ARTICLE 5. USE OF MARIJUANA FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND GLAUCOMA

O.C.G.A. § 43-34-121 (2009)

§ 43-34-121. Legislative intent

(a) The General Assembly finds and declares that the potential medicinal value of marijuana has received insufficient study due to a lack of financial incentives for the undertaking of appropriate research by private drug manufacturing concerns. Individual physicians cannot feasibly utilize marijuana in clinical trials because of federal governmental controls which involve expensive, time-consuming approval and monitoring procedures.

(b) The General Assembly further finds and declares that limited studies throughout the nation indicate that marijuana and certain of its derivatives possess valuable and, in some cases, unique therapeutic properties, including the ability to relieve nausea and vomiting which routinely accompany chemotherapy and irradiation used to treat cancer patients. Marijuana also may be effective in reducing intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients who do not respond well to conventional medications.

(c) The General Assembly further finds and declares that, in enabling individual physicians and their patients to participate in a state-sponsored program for the investigational use of marijuana and its derivatives, qualified physicians and surgeons throughout the state will be able to study the benefits of the drug in a controlled clinical setting, and additional knowledge will be gained with respect to dosage and effects.

(d) It is the intent of the General Assembly in enacting this article to permit research into the therapeutic applications of marijuana and its derivatives in cancer and glaucoma patients. This would allow qualified physicians approved by the Patient Qualification Review Board created by Code Section 43-34-124 to provide the drug on a compassionate basis to seriously ill persons suffering from the severe side effects of chemotherapy or radiation treatment and to persons suffering from glaucoma who are not responding to conventional treatment, which persons would otherwise have no lawful access to it. It is the further intent of the General Assembly to facilitate clinical trials of marijuana and its derivatives, particularly with respect to persons suffering from cancer and glaucoma who would be benefited by use of the drug.

(e) This article is limited to clinical trials and research into therapeutic applications of marijuana only for use in treating glaucoma and in treating the side effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation and should not be construed as either encouraging or sanctioning the social use of marijuana. Nothing in this article shall be construed to encourage the use of marijuana in lieu of or in conjunction with other accepted medical treatment, but only as an adjunct to such accepted medical treatment.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-902A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.


O.C.G.A. § 43-34-126 (Copy w/ Cite) Pages: 2 O.C.G.A. § 43-34-126
GEORGIA CODE
Copyright 2009 by The State of Georgia
All rights reserved.
*** Current through the 2009 Regular Session ***

TITLE 43. PROFESSIONS AND BUSINESSES
CHAPTER 34. PHYSICIANS, ACUPUNCTURE, PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS, CANCER AND GLAUCOMA TREATMENT, RESPIRATORY CARE, CLINICAL PERFUSIONISTS, AND ORTHOTICS AND PROSTHETICS PRACTICE

ARTICLE 5. USE OF MARIJUANA FOR TREATMENT OF CANCER AND GLAUCOMA
O.C.G.A. § 43-34-126 (2009)
§ 43-34-126. Immunity of program participants from state prosecution for possession or use of authorized marijuana

Patient participants in the program are immune from state prosecution for possession of marijuana as authorized by this article and under the program established in this article. A person authorized under this program shall not possess an amount of marijuana in excess of the amount prescribed under the authority of this article. The amount prescribed shall be maintained in the container in which it was placed at the time the prescription was filled. Physician, pharmacy, and pharmacist participants in the program are immune from state prosecution for possession, distribution, and any other use of marijuana, which use is authorized such persons by this article. Any such possession, distribution, or other use not authorized by this article shall be enforced and punished as provided in Chapter 13 of Title 16, relating to controlled substances and dangerous drugs, and Chapter 4 of Title 26, relating to pharmacists and pharmacies.

HISTORY: Code 1933, § 84-907A, enacted by Ga. L. 1980, p. 82, § 1; Ga. L. 1992, p. 1634, § 1; Ga. L. 2009, p. 859, § 1/HB 509.

O.C.G.A. § 43-34-126





0 likes, 1 dislike
Posted by Anonymous on 04/19/2010 at 10:07 AM

Re: “17 things to do high

Why can't you capitalize numbers? Exactly.

Posted by Anonymous on 04/14/2010 at 7:51 PM

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