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Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Atlanta 

January 22, 2013
January 22, 2013 - Photographs from events in Atlanta celebrating King Day 2013
Joeff Davis
A boy in a Baltimore Ravens jersey relaxes during the Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

The church service is considered the "spiritual hallmark" of the King Holiday.
Joeff Davis
Hosea Williams daughter, Ms. Elisabeth Omilami, CEO, Hosea Feed the Hungry, speaks at the Commemorative Service. Hosea Feed the Hungry provides more than 61,000 meals a year to hungry Atlantans.

Her words brought the crowd to their feet. "King taught how something impossible could be possible," she said. "Make Atlanta the city that's not too busy too love!"
Joeff Davis
The sanctuary was practically filled during the service, but because the presidential inauguration was happening the same day there were fewer people than previous years when people had to be turned away at the door.

Miss Jovanay Carter of Coretta Scott King Young Women's Leadership Academy is at the podium in this image. "There are two type of people, givers and takers," she said. "The takers eat better but the givers sleep better."
Joeff Davis
Recording artists Ms. Lydia Pace (left) and Ms. Latrice performing at the service.

Dr. Bernice King, King's youngest daughter, raises her hand behind the performers. She is now CEO of the King Center.
Joeff Davis
The keynote speaker at the service was Rev. Samuel Rodriguez, president of the National Hispanic Christian Leadership Conference. He was the first Hispanic keynote speaker at the Commemorative Service.

In his passionate speech he encouraged people to see past red states and blue states, "It is time for a moment that brings us together," he said.
Joeff Davis
The crowd responded to his speech by standing in worship.
Joeff Davis
Keynote speaker Rev. Samuel Rodriguez
Joeff Davis
Keynote speaker Rev. Samuel Rodriguez
Joeff Davis
Rodriguez's speech and passion was joined by an emotional crowd reaction.
Joeff Davis
At the end of the Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church, it was announced from the podium that because President Obama's inauguration was about to start they would have to cut the service short and would not have time to sing "We Shall Overcome." The crowd let out a collective sigh in disappointment. A minute passed and then somewhere in the sanctuary the instrumental sounds of "We Shall Overcome" were heard.
Joeff Davis
The crowd stood and smiled and joined hands and sang loudly with the choir: "We shall overcome, We shall overcome someday; Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe. We shall overcome someday."
Joeff Davis
Sunshine Lewis (in red) holds hands and sings at the end of the service.
Joeff Davis
Some people chose to spend their King Day volunteering. Quentin Pegram cleans up the Beltline near Washington Park.
Joeff Davis
School teacher Paquel Davis also spent the morning cleaning up the Beltline.
Joeff Davis
The front of the annual King Holiday March and Rally.
Joeff Davis
A young marcher stands next to a poster of Dr. King during the march.
Joeff Davis
DeKalb County sanitation workers marched in the rally.
Joeff Davis
The stars of this year's march were two gentlemen who had come from Memphis to be part of King Day in Atlanta. They were already part of the King legacy, as they had both been sanitation workers in 1968 when Dr. King went there to lead what would be his final march. "He was a godsent man," said Alvin Turner, 79.

Turner was a sanitation worker in Memphis for 34 years and marched with King in 1968 in what would be King's final march in support of garbage workers who had walked out for better conditions and better pay. King was killed in Memphis days later on April 4, 1968.
Joeff Davis
Former Memphis sanitation worker Baxter Leach, 73, who had also marched with King in Memphis.
Joeff Davis
DeKalb County sanitation worker Quenton Hoskins encourages the marchers.
Joeff Davis
Members of Girl Scout Troop 5819 march down Auburn Avenue.
Joeff Davis
Marching down Auburn Avenue
Joeff Davis
The marchers and crowd on Auburn Avenue. People blanketed several city blocks.
Joeff Davis
Gus Kaufman with pins. "I have marched for a long time and I get a pin at practically every march," he said as he stood at the end of the march.
Joeff Davis
A shirt honoring President Obama peeks through a man's jacket. Obama was sworn in on King Day in Washington, D.C., with his hand resting on a bible once belonging to King.
Joeff Davis
Marching on Auburn Avenue
Joeff Davis
Baton Bob marching on Auburn Avenue
Joeff Davis
Kalonji Jama Changa of the FTP movement exhorted the crowd. "No justice, no peace," he shouted.
Joeff Davis
Crowd on Auburn Avenue
Joeff Davis
Mason Right, 6, carried a sign reading, "Stop Violence."
Joeff Davis
Joeff Davis
Members of Atlanta's Occupy Our Homes chanted, "Housing is a human right!"
Joeff Davis
Sherub Tenzin, a Tibetan Monk, also marched in the parade. He escaped Tibet in 1993 by walking for 12 days.
Joeff Davis
Steppers from Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity entertained the crowd by stopping every few blocks and breaking out in dance.
Joeff Davis
Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha also danced during the march.
Joeff Davis
It was a celebratory afternoon with many hugs being exchanged.
Joeff Davis
Martin Luther King Jr. would have been 84 on January 15, 2013, had he not been murdered.
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Joeff Davis
A boy in a Baltimore Ravens jersey relaxes during the Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Commemorative Service at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

The church service is considered the "spiritual hallmark" of the King Holiday.
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