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Party at the Yellow House 

5 bands and a mob of people get wild before a staple of the house show scene goes condo

JOEFF DAVIS

The Yellow House has been a staple on Atlanta's house show scene since it was called the I Can Fly House in the early 2000s. Recently, the house's occupants learned that it would soon be destroyed to make way for a mixed-use condo development.

CHAD RADFORD

Ben Jackson, who plays in the band Warehouse, took the role of Yellow House host.

JOEFF DAVIS

A half pipe stands as if abandoned in a back room of the Yellow House. "The back room is a piece of shit," Jackson says. "Rain basically made the ramp useless."

JOEFF DAVIS

A broken fan hangs from the ceiling.

JOEFF DAVIS

The Edgewood Shopping Center as viewed from the Yellow House front lawn.

JOEFF DAVIS

A worn bench in the backyard.

JOEFF DAVIS

One aesthetic of the Yellow House is the idea of covering up something that's really ugly with something that is fake-pretty. Framed butterflies fill a hole in an attic bedroom wall.

JOEFF DAVIS

Elaine Edenfield of Warehouse (add), who lives in the Yellow House, describes the place as "bordering somewhere between a mansion and a trap house. Nothing works. Everything is falling apart," she says." It's definitely a great place to be creative. You've got a lot of space and it's dirt-cheap. I'm able to have a painting studio across the hall from my bedroom. Not to mention living with so many other creative people induces a lot of creative pressure. And then there's knowing that you're part of this legacy of the house of train hoppers and artists, people who made a lifestyle out of living freely. People who came, left a mark, and went. It creates a climate of disorder. You definitely fall into the vibe that it was and is this lawless place."

JOEFF DAVIS

Warehouse bassist Josh Hughes rehearsing at the Yellow House. Hughes says he occasionally crashes on couches there and describes it as "decrepit and awesome." He said it was so hot during their performance at the house show Monday night that he almost puked. "It was cool though," he adds.

JOEFF DAVIS

Ben Jackson's bedroom acts as the main stage for many Yellow House shows.

JOEFF DAVIS

Artists Jordan Stubbs (right) and Pastiche Lumumba install a sculpture in Ben Jackson's bedroom for Monday night's show. "The original plan was to have them hang upside down on the ceiling but the integrity of the house was called into question so I had to build it in the corner," Stubbs said. "I wanted a focal point behind the band and it's bright and yellow. I wanted to make it so that the actual signs that talk about danger were actually what was dangerous to flip-flop the meaning."

At a Yellow House show last year Stubbs covered the room in aluminum tinfoil.

JOEFF DAVIS

Designer, a band from Boston, played the house party between shows in Athens and New Orleans. During its ritualistic set, music was played loudly while bodies and instruments flew together in controlled chaos.

Designer drummer Rory (center) described their set at the Yellow House as "pretty homoerotic."

JOEFF DAVIS

JELLO SHOTS!

JOEFF DAVIS

Trevor Dixon, a Yellow House resident, enjoys a beverage during the house party. "Yellow house is an example of a living situation that gentrification and 'urban development' is stealing from Atlanta," he said. "What would you prefer to have, a Walmart at Edgewood Shopping Center with an attached 'mixed-income' apartment complex or youth culture and house shows?"

BRANDON ENGLISH

Keeping in line with the Yellow House tradition of giving touring acts a rowdy house to play, Palberta from New York was welcomed with a seething pit full of sweat, raised fists, and beer.

BRANDON ENGLISH

Scenes from the pit during Palberta's set on Monday night.

JOEFF DAVIS

Partygoers look on from the bathroom during Palberta's set.

BRANDON ENGLISH

Matt Jones rides the crowd during Polish Nails' set. Jones describes the Yellow House as a "musically talented and creative trash bag."

BRANDON ENGLISH

A trail of light frames a partygoer during Polish Nails' set.

JOEFF DAVIS

House show kitchen portrait.

JOEFF DAVIS

Austin Washington pictured in the kitchen at the Yellow House. "I wasn't there for the music, I was just there for the party," he said.

JOEFF DAVIS

Young men pose for a picture after kissing.

BRANDON ENGLISH

Deion Jones of Atlanta's Blacc Market.

BRANDON ENGLISH

The room erupted into one of the rowdiest pits of the night during Polish Nails' set. The aim for their set was to get the floor to collapse.

JOEFF DAVIS

It was a night filled with sweat-soaked abandon and loud music made all the more poignant knowing that it will all soon be gone - at least from this address.

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