July 29, 2013 Slideshows

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Nonviolent protest in Atlanta 

The legacy of the nonviolence movement lives on in Atlanta, not just in the monuments to Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil right hero-warriors, but also in the city’s streets. In the last six years there have been hundreds of protests that creatively use nonviolent tactics to challenge the status quo and to send a message to those in power that the people want change. This gallery is a selection of images from those local protests.
Alyssa Pointer
July 15, 2013 - A crowd of protestors walk on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive toward the CNN Center in reaction to the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict.
Joeff Davis
July 14, 2013 - About 40 protesters marched down Auburn Avenue early Sunday morning in response to the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the Trayvon Martin murder case. Zimmerman was found not guilty by a Florida jury late Saturday night. Jahar Taylor, dressed in a hoodie, holds a bottle of ice tea and Skittles in tribute to Trayvon Martin at around 1:30 a.m. Sunday on Auburn Avenue, during the early morning march to protest the verdict.
Joeff Davis
January 7, 2013 - Five same-sex couples applied for marriage licenses at the Probate Court at the Dekalb County courthouse in Decatur as part of the WE DO campaign. The WE DO campaign calls for "for full equality under federal law for LGBT individuals and families."

Rob Anglin (left) and Jens Palsgaard (center) were among those who applied for a marriage license. Their request was denied.

"This is the law and I am an officer of the court, a clerk of the court," said Mary Jones, the Probate Court's senior tech. "I just can't do it, I am so sorry."

Anglin responded to the clerk: "I understand and I respect that. Hopefully things will change in the future and you will be able to let people have their day together and be afforded the respect that they deserve."
Joeff Davis
March 29, 2012 - Democratic women House Members draped with caution tape, stand with backs turned on the house floor of the Georgia capitol when the conference committee report was presented on HB 954, an anti-abortion bill.
Joeff Davis
April 5, 2011 - More than 100 protesters led by seven young people brought to the United States as young children marched through Downtown Atlanta to raise awareness about undocumented youths.

After a rally in Hurt Park near Georgia State University, protesters delivered a letter to the school’s admissions office which asked GSU officials not to comply with a ban on undocumented immigrants. The Georgia Board of Regents voted in October 2010 to prohibit undocumented students from attending five of the state’s most selective colleges.

After delivering the letter to surprised admissions officials, the hundreds-strong crowd marched and chanted "Education, not deportation," “Undocumented and unafraid" and "Education, not segregation."

The seven undocumented youths then unfurled banners and sat in the middle of Courtland Street, blocking traffic for close to an hour before they were all arrested.

"I am doing this for my family, for my brothers and sisters,” said Dayanna Rebolledo, a 21-year-old factory worker and student who came to the United States from Mexico when she was 9 years old. “We are undocumented and unafraid. We are standing up for those undocumented who are afraid and who are in the shadows. We are risking everything to give our community a chance."
Joeff Davis
June 28, 2011 - Capitol police arrest six undocumented youths who blocked traffic near the state capitol on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive to protest Georgia's controversial immigration law HB87.

Undocumented Youth Rolando Zenteno, 16, was one of those arrested (pictured above).

The protest came several months after more than 100 protesters — including seven undocumented students — urged Georgia State University not to comply with a law that prohibits undocumented immigrants from attending some of the state's most competitive public colleges. The seven youths were arrested after sitting in the middle of Courtland Street but they were not deported.
Joeff Davis
March 17, 2008 - Ella Ruth Hunnicutt from the group Grandmothers for Peace sits in an Atlanta police paddy wagon after being arrested on the fifth anniversary of the Iraq War. She is one of several elderly women who were arrested while trying to enlist at the U.S. Army recruitment center at Midtown Plaza.
Joeff Davis
March 19, 2009 - A "Die In" shuts down traffic on Marietta Street on the sixth anniversary of the Iraq War.
Joeff Davis
October 7, 2009 - On the eighth anniversary of the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, a group of a more then a dozen Atlanta activists gathered on Ponce de Leon Avenue waving signs at passing cars. The group had spent the day protesting military recruitment tactics at various recruitment centers around the city, as well as at Grady High School. At the recruitment stations they delivered an ACLU drafted resolution that called on recruiters to comply with International Protocol on the Rights of the Child which forbids any contact between military recruiters and children younger than 17.
Joeff Davis
October 26, 2011 - Almost three weeks after starting the "occupation" of Woodruff Park, a large group of officers wearing eye goggles and some riot gear marched into the park and moved toward the group of approximately 50 protesters who'd volunteered to be arrested. They handcuffed the protesters with plastic ties and led — or in some cases, carried — them to a makeshift processing station at the foot of SunTrust Plaza.

"Occupy Atlanta was a network of folks that came together to take a very public stand against corporate greed and wealth disparity," said to Tim Franzen one of the spokespeople for Occupy Atlanta.
Stephanie Pharr
November 5, 2013 - Police officers arrested 20 more Occupy Atlanta protesters and supporters in and around Woodruff Park for waving signs and shouting. Nineteen of those arrested, police said in a statement, "either refused to leave Woodruff Park after 11 p.m. closing time or impeded Peachtree Street and other city roads by blocking them and not allowing police to open them to normal traffic."

A large contingent of Atlanta police in riot gear, some on motorcycles and horses marching in formation, patrolled Peachtree Street and threatened demonstrators and onlookers with arrest if they didn't remain on the sidewalk. Demonstrators on both sides of the street chanted and held signs. A CL photo intern was among those arrested.

She was charged with obstructing traffic.
Joeff Davis
December 6, 2011 - Occupy Our Homes demonstrator Ari Te tries to disrupt the foreclosure sale on the steps of the Fulton County Courthouse by shouting "Shame!"

Occupy Our Homes is a group that formed out of Occupy Atlanta. They are a "housing justice organizer that fights foreclosure, evictions and housing speculation in Atlanta."

Joeff Davis
At the protest during the foreclosure rally, civil rights icon Joseph Lowery was escorted up the courthouse steps and addressed the crowd.

Speaking with a bullhorn, Lowery said he was "saddened by the number of citizens suffering because of the economic crisis," and called for a six- to nine-month moratorium on bank foreclosures and evictions. "Banks are going to have to help poor people," Lowery said, "or we're not going to support them."
Joeff Davis
October 2, 2008 - About 25 demonstrators gathered outside the Federal Reserve Bank Building at 10th and Peachtree streets today under the banner "Bail Out the People, Not the Banks" in protest of the controversial "economic recovery" package that was approved 74-25 by the U.S. Senate last night. The U.S. House of Representatives is scheduled to vote Friday on the package. Supporters of the legislation, including Sens. Barack Obama and John McCain, threaten economic collapse if the bill fails, claiming its passage is essential not just for people on Wall Street, but also for folks on Main Street.

But these demonstrators weren't buying it. Chants of "Stop Corporate Greed Fund Human Needs", "Money for Main Street not for Wall Street" and "Bail Out the People Not The Banks" were punctuated by honking horns from passing vehicles in support of the protesters.

"I oppose bailing out billionaires," said demonstrator Ingmar Smith. "We have been trying to get basic health care funded for 20 years but as soon as Wall Street needs money its available in a week."
Joeff Davis
December 10, 2009 - Amy Miller, a waitress in Atlanta who has no health insurance, tries to get the attention of passing cars on Marietta Street.

Miller was participating in a march organized by Health Care for America Now, MoveOn Political Action, and Healthcare-NOW! to urge Senator Johnny Isakson and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to do everything in their power to pass health care reform with a public option.

“The healthcare system is broken,” Dr. Minesh Shah, a doctor of internal medicine at Grady Hospital, said during the vigil that preceded the march. “What motivates me is what I see every day, it’s a moral outrage.”
Joeff Davis
October 22, 2008 - About 50 people showed up to Woodruff Park in support of National Day of Protest Against Police Brutality.

One of the protesters was Iffat Muhammad Walker, whose brother Abraheem Muhammad was unarmed when he was shot in the head and killed during a confrontation with a DeKalb police officer in August 2006. A DeKalb County Internal Review Board later ruled that either Muhammad had pulled the trigger while attempting to shoot the officer or that the gun went off during a struggle.

Iffat says that the police report does not make sense and questions how her brother could have shot himself in the face. She also questions why the police are in charge of investigating a fellow officer. “It does not make sense. It’s like if I commit a crime and I investigate myself.”

Joeff Davis
November 21, 2007 - On the one-year anniversary of the death of Kathryn Johnston, a group gathered for a vigil in front of her home on English Avenue to remember her death and call for justice. The elderly women was shot dozens of times by Atlanta police after a mistaken drug raid in which police planted drugs in her home after murdering her. The vigil was organized by the FTP movement in Atlanta.
Joeff Davis
May 28, 2013 - More than three dozen protesters rallied this morning in Buckhead against the ongoing use of drones for military and surveillance purposes.

The demonstration kicked off what will be a week-long protest of the 2013 International Conference on Unmanned Aircraft Systems, an international drone convention currently being held at the Grand Hyatt Atlanta.

Several speakers - flanked by signs displaying messages such as "U.S. drones kill kids," "ground the drones," and "drones target civil liberties" - condemned the unmanned vehicles as secretive devices used for what they consider to be illegal targeted killings and surveillance that infringes on individuals' privacy rights.

Longtime civil rights activist Joe Beasley called the U.S. military's use of the unmanned devices 'deplorable' and said "We've become a coward country where we do things by stealth and without people knowing it. It's not befitting to our country. The use of drones had nothing to do with bravery, it's cowardice."

(text by Max Blau)
Joeff Davis
July 16, 2012 - On the same day that tens of thousands of protesters rallied in Tokyo against the restart of Japan's nuclear reactors, roughly 30 protesters chanted, marched, and handed out fliers in Midtown to protest against Georgia Power's construction of two new nuclear reactors in eastern Georgia. The two units, which are located about 175 miles from Downtown Atlanta, are the first to be built in the United States in nearly three decades.

One of the protesters dropped a large banner from the balcony of a nearby building.
Joeff Davis
December 4, 2008 - About 20 activists led by the group “Save Our Cypress Coalition” gathered outside of the corporate headquarters of Home Depot on Paces Ferry Road in Atlanta to boil crabs to protest Home Depot's use of cypress tress in mulch that they produce. They claim that irreplaceable cypress forests in the Southeast are being clear-cut to produce and sell garden mulch by Home Depot. “Clear cutting cypress forests to make mulch is like shredding the constitution to make Post-it notes,” said Dan Favre, campaign organizer for the Gulf Restoration Network.

The activists said that the crabs they brought to boil at the demonstration represented the Gulf environment that they were trying to protect. Several dozen live crabs were boiled to death and eaten to protest against the destruction of the crab environment.

According to the demonstrators, some of the cypress tress that Home Depot uses in their mulch take 100 years to grow and could live for over 1,000 years if they were not cut down and sold for garden mulch.
Dustin Chambers
September 16, 2011 - Protesters march down Auburn Avenue in support of Troy Davis.
Joeff Davis
September 15, 2011 - Death-penalty opponents and civil rights leaders this morning delivered more than 600,000 petition signatures to the state Board of Pardons and Paroles asking officials to grant clemency to Troy Davis, the long-time death-row inmate who's maintained he didn't kill Savannah police officer Mark MacPhail more than 20 years ago. More than 40,000 signatures were collected in Georgia.

According to Amnesty International, a human rights group which has helped raise awareness about Davis' case, nine individuals have signed affidavits implicating another man for the officer's killing.

"Mark MacPhail is a hero and we grieve for his mother and family," the NAACP's Edward DuBose said at a morning news conference. But "too many people have come forward and said Troy Davis did not kill MacPhail."
Joeff Davis
September 22, 2008 - The Rev. Marvin Morgan, Sister Pat Sullivan, and Steve Woodall sit-in at Governor Perdue's office in an attempt to talk to the Governor about the Troy Davis case.
Joeff Davis
Rev. Morgan and Woodall were later arrested after waiting to speak to the Governor all day and refusing to leave his office without seeing him.
Eric Cash
July 2, 2011, Downtown - Thousands stormed the State Capitol protesting the controversial law HB87 which threatens millions of undocumented immigrants.

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Alyssa Pointer
July 15, 2013 - A crowd of protestors walk on Martin Luther King Jr. Drive toward the CNN Center in reaction to the George Zimmerman "not guilty" verdict.
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