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Thursday, February 10, 2011

Georgia lawmaker who helped ban fake weed now eyes 'narcotic bath salts'

Last year, state Rep. Jay Neal successfully pushed legislation that spelled the end of synthetic marijuana in Georgia.

Now the Lafayette Republican is targeting another suburban teenager's faux-drug du jour — "narcotic bath salts," a cheap and legal alternative to cocaine and methamphetamine which Neal says can lead to hallucinations, paranoia, and even cause death. So says Neal via a press release:

“Narcotic Bath Salts create a growing concern within the state of Georgia. I have had several conversations with parents who have personally experienced their teenager citing the legality of this drug as justification for using it,” said Representative Neal. “These are dangerous substances and we must act quickly to remove them from the shelves of the corner convenience store.”

HB 199 would specifically ban five chemicals in the state of Georgia: Methyenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), Methylmethcathinone (Mephedrone), Methylenedioxymethcathinone (Methylone), Methoxymethcathinone, and Fluoromethcathinone. These chemicals all belong to the chemical family of cathinones, a group of drugs related to amphetamine compounds like ecstasy. Commonly manufactured in China and India, the chemicals targeted by HB 199 are currently sold online and in stores throughout the state as plant fertilizer, insect repellant, and fake “bath salts.” Common brand names of the drug are Ivory Wave, White China, Infinity, Cloud-9, White Dove, and Ocean. These can be purchased for as little as $20 a pack.

So can cigarette cartons. It'll be interesting if manufacturers try to defend the listed chemicals, however. God knows what other profitable products use those tongue twisters.

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