Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Leap Year wants to help jump start emerging artists' careers

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 2:57 PM

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Ever wonder what it'd feel like to win the lottery? If you're an emerging Atlanta artist, being awarded one of three spots in the expansive new mentorship program Leap Year, spearheaded by MINT Gallery, probably feels pretty close.

According to the website, Leap Year will:

provide three emerging artists with timely monetary and interpersonal support, it will also help them understand how to move forward as creative individuals. Participants will be paired with two different mentors, receive free memberships to many arts related organizations in the Atlanta area, and will be able to participate in a series of workshops and discussion groups specifically tailored to their medium, background and needs. They will also receive a small stipend to be used for supplies, free studio space and opportunities for community service and public art installations. At the end of the program, the three artists will have a group exhibition to showcase their new body of work.

Sounds like a pretty sweet deal for Atlanta up-and-comers.

MINT created Leap Year in collaboration with community arts center WonderRoot, Georgia Lawyers for the Arts, North Georgia artist residency the Hambidge Center, Bang! Arts Management and Promotion, and arts service org C4.

"Leap Year grew out of several community gatherings that were organized to bring together various arts organizations and individuals in Atlanta," says MINT's Erica Jamison. "From these meetings and other discussions, we realized that in order for Atlanta to grow as a creative, sustainable city, we needed to support not only our established artists, but emerging artists as well. To date, there haven't been any other comprehensive programs in Atlanta — that we're aware of — that are geared specifically to emerging artists."

"The creative energy in Atlanta is amazing. Though it can be rather daunting for emerging artists to understand how to find their place and make their name in Atlanta. We imagine Leap Year as a way for emerging artists to dive head first into this community with a life jacket on!" says collaborator Stephanie Dowda.

"We believe Atlanta needs to support artists of all levels not only to improve their individual lives, but to generate a supportive and hospitable environment for creative output. We're hoping that in supporting these artists, we will increase overall interest and support in the city," says Jamison.

Applications, available here, are due FRI., JULY 8, 5 P.M. Additional requirements for applicants listed below the jump.

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'The Bachelorette': Ashley and Bentley get their period ... then everyone else does

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 1:57 PM

Raggin
Boy, do I wish Ashley would learn what ellipses are so she could stop saying Bentley left her with a "dot, dot, dot." BUT even though she's a dentist (kind of), not a grammarist, at least girfrent knows a period when she's confronted with one. And doesn't care that "period" also means menstruation.

Chris Harrison, who's apparently taken a break from tying women to railroad tracks and twisting his mustache between his thumb and forefinger, catches Ashley off-guard (I'm so sure) by showing up unannounced (definitely announced) at her Hong Kong hotel room. "You're scaring me," she says. YOU SHOULD BE SCARED. Why? Because Bentley's made the trip to China to complete the gargantuan — and, I'm sure, wholly enjoyable — task of humiliating you!

Wearing her casual costume of choice — a blousy collared shirt, heels and pants that cling ever-so-tightly to her pleasantly bowed legs — Ashley makes her way to room 666 to get pooed on.

Ooooo-wheeeee, is this meeting awkward. Because he's flown "half-way across the world" to see her, Ashley momentarily tricks herself into thinking that it's a gesture, but WE know the only gesture Bentley knows is this one. He opens the door and manages to smile and hug her, so OF COURSE she goes in for a kiss. Refusing to make herself tolerable to a man who already thinks she's the worst, Ashley does the most disgusting thing in the world and swipes the palm of her hand across his mouth to remove whatever lip smegma she'd left behind. Seriously, the man's a saint for not picking her up and throwing her through a window.

After some failed small talk about bug bites — "Do you have sweet blood?" Bentley asks, and then zones out whilst fantasizing about bashing her skull in and licking the blood from his fists — they have some failed "us" talk. Bentley says something like, "I think you know where I’m at and I think you know where I’m coming from a little bit. I think you’re here for a reason, and knowing that I’m home, it doesn’t look good for me and you. I would implore you to do all you can to see what you have here I guess."

"So, this is our period," Ashley responds. Yes. You're women now. (More on people becoming women later.)

She's so much a glutton for punishment, she insists he explain why he flew all the way there instead of just calling her. Bentley manages, "I wanted to see you," but it's, like, read between the lines, wouldja lady? Or, better yet, just regular read the lines that the rest of the world is reading: Bentley's there because it's a free trip to Hong Kong.

Seriously, I'll be a sonofabitch if the second Ashley left his room Bentley didn't strap on a pair of Tevas, toss a tiny rucksack over his shoulder, grab his Kodak Funsaver and just DO IT LARGE in Hong Kong. In every subsequent street scene, I fully expected to see him in the background, smiling from ear-to-ear and posing for photos with locals, or screaming "I'M HAVING SO MUCH FUN RIGHT NOW" and skipping off to his next Asian adventure (I'm actually in the process of developing a show called "Bentley's Asian Adventure").

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'Robopocalypse's' human survivors rage against the machine

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 12:01 PM

Filmmaker Stephen Spielberg committed to direct the adaptation of Robopocalypse in October of 2010. Daniel H. Wilson's sci-fi novel wasn't published until June 7 of this year, but maybe Spielberg's "precogs" from Minority Report told him it would be a hit.

It always annoys me a little when publishers release books presold as movies-to-be, since it makes the publishing business feel like an extension of Hollywood. As the source of the 2013 film release of America's most successful movie director, Robopocalypse arrives pre-annointed as a significant novel, and it feels scarcely relevant whether it lives up to the hype. For what it's worth, Robopocalypse turns out to be an exciting and imaginative technothriller, like the kind the late Michael Crichton used to write.

Robopocalypse resembles Max Brooks' entertaining bestseller World War Z, only if you searched the manuscript for the word "zombie" and replaced it with "robot." Like Brooks, Wilson previously wrote a satirical handbook about surviving a sci-fi apocalypse, then used his research as raw material for a sprawling, multi-character novel. Robopocalypse takes place in the near future, but many of the book's military, industrial or domestic robots seem technologically plausible. The servant robot model called "Big Happy" sounds like a taller, more sophisticated version of the Asimo.

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Morning Newsdome: Wildfires shut down top nuclear weapons research facility

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 11:15 AM

>> A wildfire in New Mexico has forced one of the top American nuclear weapons research facilities to remain closed through Thursday. The lab led the development of the atomic bomb after opening during WWII. Nope, nothing to worry about here. (BBC)

>> The Supreme Court struck down California's ban on violent video games to minors in a 7-2 decision, saying that it violates the First and Fourteenth Amendments. Give me Mario Party any day. (the New York Times)

>> First it was making circumcision illegal. Now San Francisco considers banning the sale of any animal as a pet, from ferrets to fish. All I want for my imaginary son is to have a circumcised penis and a puppy to play with. (LA Times)

>> Greek police fired teargas at protesting youth today who rallied against spending cuts, tax increases and privatization as part of the country's plan to avoid debt default. Greece is in its worst recession since the '70s with youth unemployment at more than 40 percent. Sorry jobless kids, it's the new austerity. (Reuters)

>> And finally: First Michele Bachmann claimed that the Founding Fathers worked "tirelessly" to end slavery—which is of course not true—and later cited John Quincy Adams as an abolitionist Founder, even though he didn't participate in the Declaration of Independence or the Constitution. Then when announcing her run for presidency in her hometown of Waterloo, Iowa, she said she has "the kind of spirit" of hometown boy "John Wayne." Except it's not the actor from Waterloo—it's serial killer John Wayne Gacy who dressed as a clown and raped and murdered 33 young men. Gacy is a Founding Father too. (ABC News, Washington Times)

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Wicked Bugs catalogs a host of nasty insects

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 10:48 AM

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If you're like me, you think of bugs as coming in three varieties: scary, nasty, and annoying. The new book Wicked Bugs by Amy Stewart will do little to change such prejudices, but it may cause you to add a few more.

With Wicked Bugs, Stewart has compiled a compendium of all the most dangerous and deadly insects known to man. It's actually a fun little book with its throw-back cover, black-and-white etchings, and antiqued off-white pages: It looks like a curious volume dug up from some dusty Victorian library (You can imagine one of the children from an Edward Gorey illustration flipping through the pages... just before being done in by Oriental rat fleas). Stewart divides her awful insects into five categories: There's Painful, Dangerous, Deadly, Destructive, and the just downright Horrible.

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A few questions with Dubelyoo

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 10:15 AM

Dubelyoo, Summer in the City
  • DUBELYOO
  • Dubelyoo, "Summer in the City"

Atlanta-based artist Dubelyoo has been applying his visual talents in wide variety of media - from illustration work for magazines like Complex and XXL to design work ranging from newspapers to corporate clients to running the Arts Beats + Lyrics festival at venues all across the country. Oh, and he happens make some time for painting, too. This weekend, his latest solo exhibition, a continuation of his Convert the Wack series, comes to a venue in Atlantic station. We caught up with him to find out a little more about the show.

What's the inspiration behind the "Convert the Wack" series?

This show has a variety of inspirations. It is comprised of pieces that are urban themed mixed with some classical drawings and some more newer social commentary paintings. I started putting everything together for this show early this year.

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Judge tells Atlanta to cough up College Park's tax money

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 9:01 AM

The Georgia Court of Appeals ruled last week that the city of Atlanta may have to repay College Park millions of dollars worth of taxes it improperly collected at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

At issue are occupational taxes Atlanta collects from businesses inside the airport that are actually in the city limits of College Park. In 2007, Atlanta sued after College Park announced its intentions of collecting the taxes.

According to Steve Fincher, attorney for College Park, Atlanta will have to repay the city all improperly collected taxes from 2005 until now.

Chief Judge Ellington wrote in the decision:

After a hearing on the parties' cross-motions for partial summary judgment, the trial court determined that only College Park is authorized to levy, assess, and collect an occupation tax on businesses operating at the airport within its city limits. The trial court also determined that only College Park is authorized to impose and collect taxes on the sale, storage, and distribution of alcoholic beverages at the airport within its city limits. Accordingly, the trial court granted a declaratory judgment in favor of College Park on these issues.

It's not clear how much money Atlanta will have to pay College Park. Maybe the city found a good use for the cash it'll save after overhauling pensions?

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5 things today: Bar pong, David Bazan

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 8:00 AM

Greg Kodesh is just one of the fanatical bar pong players to challenge at the Albert tonight
  • JOEFF DAVIS
  • Greg Kodesh is just one of the fanatical bar pong players to potentially challenge at the Albert tonight

1. "Play the best on the bar pong circuit" at the Albert
2. David Bazan plays the Earl
3. Radcliffe Bailey: Memory as Medicine continues at the High
4. Sip on some family-produced wine with Steve Pignatiello at Perrine's Wine Shop
5. True Legend continues at the Plaza

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5 things today: Bar pong, David Bazan

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 8:00 AM

Greg Kodesh is just one of the fanatical bar pong players to challenge at the Albert tonight
  • JOEFF DAVIS
  • Greg Kodesh is just one of the fanatical bar pong players to potentially challenge at the Albert tonight

1. "Play the best on the bar pong circuit" at the Albert
2. David Bazan plays the Earl
3. Radcliffe Bailey: Memory as Medicine continues at the High
4. Sip on some family-produced wine with Steve Pignatiello at Perrine's Wine Shop
5. True Legend continues at the Plaza

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Georgia Entertainment Media Work Ready Region presents Industry Animation Training: Toon Boom Comes to Town

Posted By on Tue, Jun 28, 2011 at 6:37 AM

Boom Goes the Dynamite
  • Toon Boom
  • Boom Goes the Dynamite

Just as the Supreme Court ruled that states cannot "regulate the sale or rental of violent video games to children, saying governments do not have the power to restrict the ideas to which children may be exposed despite complaints about graphic violence, Georgia's Department of Economic Development and Digital Entertainment Office announced that it will be underwriting FREE training for Toon Boom, an industry standard software for animation, valued at $2,500 per course.

Looking to increase interest in a $555 Billion dollar industry, Georgia work ready hopes to entice tech savvy companies to focus on gaming, mobile devices, e-learning applications, special effects, stop motion and integration of 3D animation.

Those looking to take advantage of this incredible opportunity to these free courses must be referred by their employers.

The complete press release follows:

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