Tuesday, July 19, 2011

The Creatives Project rolls out first residency program

Posted By on Tue, Jul 19, 2011 at 6:31 PM

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The Creatives Project has rolled out the first of its four residency programs for artists. A local community arts organization founded by photographer Neda Abghari, TCP works through arts-based education and outreach. Earlier this year, TCP launched its Creative Community Housing Project - a program designed to offer studio space, and eventually housing, to local artists.

"There is a need," Abghari told CL last February. "There are artists whose lives need to be supported. ... And, there's the need for education programming."

CCHP's Artist-In-Residency Program "will provide six Atlanta artists with free long-term studio spaces and exhibition opportunities for a minimum of one year. In exchange, each of the selected artists will complete mentorship with a youth artist of [One Love Generation] for three hours one night per week. The studios and exhibition spaces are located at The Goat Farm Arts Center in Atlanta, Georgia; where the mentorship will also take place," according to a press release.

Application info can be found here. Deadline is AUGUST 31, and programs begin SEPTEMBER 25.

Up next on the CCHP residency agenda:

The CCHP Artist-in-Residency provides long term (1-3 yr.) subsidized residencies (fall '12).
The CCHP Exhibiting Artist is provided a three month exhibition (spring '12).
The CCHP Visiting Artist is provided a short term (1-3 mo.) residency, studio, & exhibition (spring '13)

TCP's also in the middle of its citywide summer arts supply drive for its Community Arts Program, which mentors at-risk youth through the arts. Keep your eyes peeled for these red bins around town and drop in your spare arts goodies.

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