Monday, April 2, 2012

Pics of the week: What would it take for you to set yourself on fire?

Posted By on Mon, Apr 2, 2012 at 6:27 PM

Sine Die at the Georgia Capitol. Just after midnight last Friday, on the 40th, and last day of the Georgia legislative session, lawmakers celebrate by throwing their papers in the air. When they are done there is a huge mess left for others to clean up.
  • Joeff Davis
  • Sine Die at the Georgia Capitol. Just after midnight last Friday, on the 40th, and last day of the Georgia legislative session, lawmakers celebrate by throwing their papers in the air. When they are done there is a huge mess left for others to clean up.

Creative Loafing awards its annual Golden Sleaze awards (pictured)

What would it take for you to set yourself on fire? For one Tibetan in India, it was the Chinese president visiting New Delhi (WARNING very intense and graphic photo not for everyone )

Ever wonder what Rome would have looked like in the year 320 AD, check it out in 3-D

What does a successful face transplant look like?

A new type of clouds is discovered

My worst photographs

What is truth, photographs of Trayvon Martin & George Zimmerman

Stories behind some of the most iconic music pictures

"It's a completely alien world," Titanic director James Cameron talks about his visit to the deepest place on earth, 35,756 feet deep in the ocean

Tags:

Saturday, March 31, 2012

5 things today: Dean and Britta, Bon Rappetite

Posted By on Sat, Mar 31, 2012 at 7:00 AM

1. Dean and Britta play songs for Andy Warhol's screen tests at Symphony Hall
2. Bon Rappetite launches at the Basement
3. Jeffrey Butzer and the Bicycle Eaters play the Earl
4. Trash Dance screens at the Landmark Midtown Theatre
5. Bacon Fest at Dad's Garage

Tags:

5 things today: Dean and Britta, Bon Rappetite

Posted By on Sat, Mar 31, 2012 at 7:00 AM

1. Dean and Britta play songs for Andy Warhol's screen tests at Symphony Hall
2. Bon Rappetite launches at the Basement
3. Jeffrey Butzer and the Bicycle Eaters play the Earl
4. Trash Dance screens at the Landmark Midtown Theatre
5. Bacon Fest at Dad's Garage

Tags:

Friday, March 30, 2012

Watch City Hall East parking garage demolition ... in TIME LAPSE

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 5:12 PM

Time lapse videos are fun. As a society, we love them. Probably because we're impatient, and would live our lives fast forwarding through things with remote controls like in the movie "Click," a plot we'd be familiar with if we hadn't fast forwarded through the whole thing. It was for the best.

Anyway, here's a ten-second video of City Hall East's parking deck being gobbled up by a jaunty backhoe with comical musical accompaniment. ENJOY.

Tags: , , ,

Criminal justice reform — what we ended up with

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 4:20 PM

Since last year, when the Georgia Legislature created a 13-member panel to recommend reforms to the state's cumbersome — financially and otherwise — criminal justice system, CL has watched the process with, perhaps, uncharacteristic optimism. We called it a "progressive take" on criminal justice, and applauded the governor for his enthusiasm for finding alternatives to incarceration and saving loads of money.

That panel submitted its recommendations and the resulting legislation — HB 1176 — passed both the House and the Senate with overwhelming support on both sides of the aisle.

We spoke with Sen. Jason Carter the other day and he said that overall, he thinks this criminal justice package is "a pretty great thing."

"Does it go far enough? Probably not in some areas. Overall, it’s positive step."

The bill's main purpose is to decrease the number of people being sent to prison by reducing the severity of certain lower-level drug and property crimes, and by making use of pre-trial intervention and diversion programs like drug and mental health courts. Lawmakers estimate this could save the state $264 million over the next five years and also improve recidivism rates by allowing people to get help rather than just locking them up.

It also includes a provision that hides from everyone but the courts and law enforcement arrests that didn't result in a conviction.

At the risk of breaking our optimistic streak, there's an aspect of the bill that's concerning: the fee to participate in pre-trial intervention programs was increased from $300 to $1,000. It's a cost of admission that could be prohibitive to lots of people — those who can afford it get a lifeline, those who can't get the shaft. In the zero hour, Sen. Vincent Fort (D-Atlanta) introduced an amendment to reduce that fee from $1,000 to $600, but it was voted down. The fee is decided upon by the prosecuting attorney, which also seems odd. Sen. Carter submitted an amendment that would have given that power to a judge instead, but he ended up withdrawing it.

Asked if the fee increase constitutes a pay-to-play scenario that disenfranchises the poor, Carter said, "It’s certainly a risk. But ... I have some faith that the prosecutors are not creating a way to buy yourself out of certain punishment and I’m confident they’re trying to reduce recidivism and lower crime. I have faith in the prosecutors."

Tags: , , ,

Don't let the Internet talk you out of buying a lottery ticket today

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 1:41 PM

Mega_Millions_Lottery_Ok_buy-ticket.png

I really wish I could make money on bets like, "Someone will post/print/air a story today telling people how futile it is to try to win the $540 million Mega Millions lottery drawing tonight."

Oh, look here! Someone did.

Here's the deal: It's not only OK for you to buy a lottery ticket today, it's probably a good thing. Buying a lottery ticket does not mean you or I actually think we're going to win. It is a wish-fulfillment exercise, one for which I'm spending $1, or $3, or $5, or whatever. Is that too much? I have spent more money than that on iPhone apps to make my shitty pictures look artfully shitty. I think it's OK that I plop down a few bones for this.

Again, I don't do this because I really think I'm going to win — I understand math. I do this for what comes next: the dreaming.

I think it's a very healthy thing to imagine exactly what you would do if you won. Starting with, would your really quit your job? The answer is some variation of "of course!" — but in what way? Would you agree to consult, freelance, find your replacement? I think this tells you something about why you do your job, and how attached (or not) you are to it. I think that's healthy. You also do this with other life choices: Would I move? Where to? Why? If that's where I want to be, then why don't I start taking steps today to someday get there? Would I tell anyone? Would I start life over as my alter ego, Reece Hawks, continental badass?

Then, the not-as-fun but necessary part: dividing up the money.

Continue reading »

Tags: , , ,

Time and Place: Burning eyelids

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 1:40 PM

This photo was taken at 10:13 p.m. on March 23, 2012, at 750 Kalb St. after the Imperial House of Opa's performance at the Arts Exchange. Following the show, the performers invited lingering guests outside to witness some of their fire-handling techniques. The tricks ranged from fire juggling to flaming hula-hoop dancing. Pictured in this photo is the ring leader, Tim Mack, wielding flaming poi, which are traditionally tethered weights or poi balls. In this case Tim was using Kevlar and a chain soaked in white gas.

To ensure the safety of the performers, there were several people wielding flame-retardant blankets, one of which can be seen toward the upper right corner of the photo. Despite there being no accidents that night, I talked to Tim about his early years of fire handling, during which he was burned a multitude of times. He told me that once he had the skin on his eyelids burned and he had to have his sister peel the skin off. Tim also described the sensation of catching fire as feeling "like a nice warm hug that turns into an intense fiery pain."

More photos from the Imperial Opa performance

Tags: , ,

This anti-T-SPLOST YouTube video is mesmerizing

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 1:03 PM


This video was sent out this morning by the State of Georgia Tea Party with this message:

Folks you must watch this 53 sec video from the Lanier Tea Party. It is really good.

With an endorsement like that, how could we not watch?

It's only 52 seconds, actually, so I'll let you take in its "T-SPLOST IS EVIL" message. The thing I can't stop marveling at are the punctuation and capitalization choices made. The highlights:

* :04 "Not One Cent ...." - Starts off with capping every word, and using four periods as ellipses instead of three. Bold.
* :05 "One Percent" - Spells out "percent" instead of using % (see "1 %" at :02). Odd.
* :08 "This is going to Add up fast!" - I'm okay with using an exclamation point here. But we've switched to sentence case, although "Add" refuses to give up its capital A. Defiant.
* :11 "They say it will go to maintain this...." - Sentence case, no space after last word but still four periods for ellipses. I think we've settled on a style. Thumbs up.
* :14 "And Fix This....." - Gaaaaah! We're back to capping words! And now we've got five periods! Anarchy!
* :18 "But your hard earned money will really go to this...." - You know, I don't care about not hyphenating the compound adjective. I'm just relieved this roller-coaster has reached level ground. Sentence case. No space. Four periods.
* :25 We're back to capitalizing one word ("Tax"), we're mixing sentence case and all-caps, only three periods for the ellipses. Uncle.

You get the idea. I'm working on an algorithm that identifies the pattern here. Also, can you help Gwynedd and me figure out what the music is most like? She says it's horror-movie genre, I say sci-fi evil guy, kinda Darth Vadar-ish.

Tags: , ,

Augusta National Golf Club's war on women (OK, now I'm just kidding)

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 12:45 PM

The Augusta National Golf Club is all about tradition. Tradition holds that only people with penises can be members. Until 1990, only white penis people could be members. Tradition also holds that the CEOs of each of the Masters Tournament's three sponsors — AT&T, ExxonMobil, and IBM — receive honorary memberships to the club.

As Jezebel and other outlets point out, this presents a predicament for the ugly-green-jacket club this year, now that one of the CEOs is this guy ...


That's Ginni Rometty, and she became CEO of IBM earlier this year. Will they stick to their guns (intentional phallic imagery) and deny her membership while they extend it to the other CEOs? Will they bite the bullet, and finally admit a woman after 80 years of refusing to do so?

A thing that's been repeatedly pointed out: Augusta is a private club and they can do whatever they want. If they don't want to let ladies in, they plain don't have to. The Washington Post makes this analogy ...

You want to tell Augusta whom it must accept as a member? Be prepared to tell the same thing to the YWCA, PFLAG, the sisters of Chi Omega, and African American fraternities — and to seize and review their membership lists.

Point taken. Also worth mentioning: IBM was a boys club until Rometty came along. She's the first female CEO in their 100-year history. Traditions die hard. But, sometimes they do actually die.

The Masters Tournament kicks off on Monday.

Tags: , , ,

Republican legislators win war on women, exclaim 'We're goin' to Disney World'

Posted By on Fri, Mar 30, 2012 at 11:10 AM

A majority of Democratic house members, led by the democratic women draped with caution tape, stood with backs turned when the conference committee report was presented on the HB 954.
  • Joeff Davis
  • A majority of Democratic house members, led by the democratic women draped with caution tape, stood with backs turned when the conference committee report was presented on the HB 954.

Feel that, ladies? That was the unpleasant sensation of elected officials chipping away at your rights.

But this isn't about what YOU feel. This is about what FETUSES feel, OK? Republican lawmakers submitted HB 954 based on the suspect supposition that that fetuses can feel pain at 20 weeks.

Here. Read this.

In a recent paper in The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Glenn Cohen of Harvard Law School and Sadath Sayeed of Harvard Medical School note that there is no conclusive evidence that fetuses can feel pain at that point in gestation, nor are they considered viable.

While there's an established body of evidence that fetuses start developing the biological pathways related to pain sensation at this stage, there is not enough data to suggest that they can actually experience it. The bulk of the scientific literature on the subject indicates that the brain connections required to feel pain are not in place until at least 24 weeks. The lawmakers and anti-abortion groups arguing for the 20-week bans are "espousing a view that aligns with the political hope" rather than medical evidence, says Sayeed, who is both a neonatologist and a lawyer.

But, whatever.

The bill that the House originally passed didn't make any concessions for extenuating circumstances — not for instances of rape or incest, nor for women who are carrying fetuses that will for sure die outside the womb. When the Senate got ahold of it, they added a provision for "medically futile" pregnancies, those in which chromosomal or congenital abnormalities would basically kill the child outside the womb. The House was like, "No. Uh uh," but eventually decided to cut their losses and go along with the changes in order to get the bill passed. The AJC says, "Other small tweaks to the bill's language were made" as well. There's still no exception for pregnancies that resulted from rape or incest. Carry that rapist's baby to term and shut up about already! Jeez. Women.

But, hey. Georgia Right to Life — despite disagreeing with the Senate's changes — is happy! After all, this means Georgia is one step closer to outlawing abortion all together. President Dan Becker was quoted as saying, "We commend the Legislature. This is one of the toughest pro life laws in the nation ... It will save roughly 1,500 lives a year."

Female democratic legislators wrapped themselves in caution tape and exited the chambers. In the hall they chanted, "Women will remember in November." (Video here.) We'll see if that's true.

You can read the bill in its entirety here.

Tags: , ,

Search Events

Search Fresh Loaf

Recent Comments

© 2014 Creative Loafing Atlanta
Powered by Foundation