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Chef Liu

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Chef Liu’s newer location is relatively larger than the old shack that made it so famous. There still isn’t much in the way of decor, but the ambiance is inviting. The menu has grown to a full four pages of Chinese specialties built on a foundation of core dishes that made the former location a hot spot.
Bei Jing Kabobs

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Te Wei Chinese Kabobs specializes in the Chinese Muslim street food "chuanr," grilled and skewered kabobs. Most of the ingredients used — vegetables, seafood, meats, you name it — are seasoned with cumin, chili flakes, salt and sesame, and practically everything is covered in sesame seeds. None of the kabobs costs more than $2. Some, like the quail eggs, chicken hearts and most of the vegetables, are only 50 cents. Add a bowl of soup and some dumplings and you have a relatively healthy and shockingly inexpensive meal that's big on flavor and interest. Even if Te Wei's menu isn't the typical phone book-length tome, regular Chinese restaurant rules apply: It's closed on Tuesday.

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This Chamblee restaurant is known mostly for its dim sum.
Canton House

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Canton House is the favorite for dim sum in Atlanta's Chinese community. We're not surprised. Few dim sums are operated with such efficiency and such a broad menu. Anything made with shrimp or barbecued pork is bound to please even the most unadventurous diner. Get the rice cooked with pork, wrapped in lotus leaves. The fragrance when it is unwrapped is worth the price.
Northern China Eatery

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Hidden on the side of a building, Northern China Eatery is soup dumpling heaven. Make sure to pair yours with some black rice vinegar as you slurp your way into a food coma.
Man Chun Hong

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The Korean-Chinese menu remains, but try the request-only Szechuan menu. Besides the Husband and Wife Lung, there's Slobber Chicken, and if you’ve always wondered what Mao Tse Tung liked to eat, there's a pork-belly dish named for him.

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While Lucky China does the usual short and speedy lunch menu, the dinner menu is available throughout the day. Not that there's anything wrong with the standard lunch. It's just that it's ... the standard lunch. The dinner menu is far more interesting, and though your meal won't appear before you in a matter of seconds, it won't take much longer. And besides, your server will rush out with little tidbits you can nibble on immediately: one egg roll and a hot chicken wing.
Hong Kong BBQ

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While the atmosphere feels like the hawker centers of Hong Kong, the food could not be better. Nearly 100 items are included on the menu and the portions are generous and the price low. For Chinese food, Hong Kong BBQ is the place to be.

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As far as Chinese food goes, this is place is hit or miss, but as a kosher Chinese establishment it's become a destination. The buffalo wings are slowly earning a reputation and the Chinese vegetable wrap (think a burrito with snow peas and bamboo shoots) was a nice variation.

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Asian counter-serve spot offers a variety of bubble tea drinks and food including chicken nuggets.
Bo Bo Garden

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Bo Bo Garden is located in a rather dapper space that formerly housed a Korean restaurant. Don't come expecting American Chinese, forget sweet and sour chicken. The current, enormous menu of high-quality traditional Chinese staples includes Cantonese/Hong Kong-style casseroles, dumplings, noodle soups, and a must-order Hong Kong-style lobster for when you're feeling lavish.
Royal China

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Although the Cantonese cuisine is highly erratic, the elegant decor and new restrooms make a visit almost mandatory for old hands. On balance, try dinner rather than lunch, vegetables and seafood over meat.
First China

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This spot looks like your typical Buford Highway Chinese joint, with one exception: the coolest fish-less aquarium we've ever seen. There's more than 250 menu items, plus 40 dim sum lunch choices, ranging from standard Americanized offerings to those without mass Western appeal (intestines with sour cabbage, anyone?). Tend toward choices falling between these extremes, like the bitter melon with beef, preserved egg and fish soup, or crispy duck.

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Located in the former Gu's Bistro space on Buford Highway, Good Luck Gourmet is a Sichuan restaurant that features seldom-seen specialties of China's Shaanxi region.
21 total results

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