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The restaurant excels at simple beauty, in its classic American setting and in its flavor combinations. Cauliflower has just the right amount of lemon and caramelized edges to set it off. The antipasto plate will have you moving appreciatively from the warm semolina bread to the creamy feta cheese to the cured meats and pickled veggies. One may have a gut reaction to the all-around perfection, to the modern country club vibe, and feel of exclusivity. But there's no doubt that the Hil's food lives up to its surroundings, in quality as well as aspirations.
Home Grown

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Home grown is a picturesque illustration of its straightforward aspirations and its eclectic Reynoldstown neighborhood. Most of what is served is grown by local farmers; therefore, the menu is short and changes daily, depending on what’s available. Simple Southern classics, however, such as a fried pork chop with gravy, are almost always available. For sides, be sure to order the creamed corn, fried green tomatoes, or other fresh local vegetables. Breakfast items include flaky biscuits with the standard egg/meat/cheese combinations and other soul-lifting eats. All the lunch entrees are available as the "blue collar lunch plate," which includes a side and a drink. Home grown is an evolution, for locavorism, for Reynoldstown and for Atlanta.

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New Southern cuisine with local ingredients make this North Fulton restaurant a standout. The restored 150-year-old farmhouse in Crabapple's historic district has a bar, fireplace and patio.
Our Way Cafe

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You'll find basic, good and cheap home-style food at this mellow, egalitarian hole-in-the-wall. Vegetables, casseroles and sides are particularly appealing here; we like the black-eyed peas, greens, mashed potatoes and spicy corn bread. If you owe someone in the area a lunch, this is the place to bring 'em whether it's your mechanic, your debutante niece or that philosophy professor you want to butter up.
Parish: The Brasserie & Neighborhood Cafe

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Formerly known as Parish, the Inman Park restaurant helmed by chef Stuart Tracy, relaunched as the Brasserie & Neighborhood Café at Parish in August 2014. The Beltline-adjacent eatery at 240 N. Highland Ave. now offers simplified, familiar flavors in the form of dishes including goat cheese and beet jam on toast; corned duck leg with cabbage, potatoes, horseradish, and hazelnuts; and pistachio sausage with dijon potato salad and vinegar onions. Downstairs, the former Parish Market (branded anew as the Neighborhood Café at Parish) continues to serve coffee, breakfast pastries, sandwiches, wine, and other items. A casual patio is also available for all your relaxation needs.
Serpas

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This is chef-owner Scott Serpas' first solo venture after stepping out from under the Concentrics umbrella where he worked for three years as chef at Two Urban Licks. Serpas has an upscale Southern menu, sometimes with a New Orleans twist. The restaurant itself is great on the eyes but hard on the ears when it's crowded. Reservations required for parties of eight or more.
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