You searched for:

  • [X]Gwinnett County
  • [X]Duluth
  • [X]Dinner
  • [X]No Ratings (yet)
Start over

Search for…

Narrow Search

18 results
Iron Age

Tools

Most of the cooking is done on a grooved and tilted cast-iron griddle. The main draw is the all-you-can-eat barbecue -- $14.99 buys you an unlimited supply of pork belly, sliced brisket and bibimbap. You receive a family-size bowl of vegetable and bean soup, which one diner dubbed "Korean minestrone." Rice cake wrappers and slices of daikon are served along with lightly dressed lettuce, some assorted banchan, and an array of dipping sauces for your meats. The meat is better at Honey Pig, but Iron Age is less expensive and more fun.
Umaido

Tools

Umaido is Georgia's first ramen-ya. Other local Japanese restaurants -- such as Yakitori Jinbei, Shoya and Blue Fin Sushi -- also serve the delicacy, but Umaido is the only restaurant to specialize in the once elusive comfort food.
Honey Pig

Tools

If you've never ventured into a Korean barbecue restaurant but have an inkling that tons of grilled meat cooked in front of you might be fun, then get thee to Honey Pig. It's about the most delicious, least intimidating Korean restaurant imaginable. This isn't to say that Honey Pig is inauthentic or watered down. On the contrary, the samgyeopsal jip is a specialized Korean barbecue house that deals in pork belly. There are numerous pork belly options, including a number of marinated versions, but the house specialty--the honey pig--is the way to go.

Tools

Southwestern and Asian on the same menu? The pairing may sound unlikely, but Sia's has been forging its own brand of fusion for six years with consistently thrilling results. Set in the tony Shops of St. Ives (an oxymoron-defying upscale strip mall), the restaurant's amber-hued ambiance inspires locals to pull out their cocktail dresses and sports jackets for an evening of easygoing glamour.
East Pearl

Tools

A ski lodge in Duluth may seem like the least likely place to find some great dim sum, but appearances are deceiving. With pork siu mai dumplings, silken tofu drizzled with a tangy ginger sauce and somewhere around 170 more exotic offerings, East Pearl will satisfy the dim sum lover every time.

Tools

Song Do's premise is simple: Choose from one of four all-you-can-eat options, the Ruby, Silver, Gold or Diamond, all of which includes several kinds of meat. With the base package, the Ruby at $12.99 ($9.99 at lunch) at the bottom and the Diamond at the top only $24.99, the prices are a steal. Keep in mind that at most Korean barbecue joints, just one kind of meat can cost upward of $20. The quality of the banchan (side dishes) is a mixed bag depending on what you choose. The chili-laced bean sprouts tasted incredibly fresh. The chunks of daikon, however, were overmarinated and soft around the edges, like they'd been sitting around for a while. This is more of a do-it-yourself kind of operation, but that just adds to the fun. Song Do's only caveat: Everyone in your party has to order the same package.

Tools

Tools

Tools

Tools

Poona Indian Restaurant

Tools

Indian restaurant serving buffet daily, for lunch and dinner. Great selection of desserts.
Boudreaux's Café Acadiana

Tools

This Cajun restaurant was voted best seafood in Gwinnett in 2012 and 2013 in the Best of Gwinnett awards. It serves authentic Louisiana Cajun cuisine such as its grouper evangeline, gator po'boy, gumbo, and more.

Tools

Dan Moo Ji

Tools

Entering the colorful restaurant feels like you've accidentally stumbled into a teen girl's bedroom. The walls are covered with hearts, cartoon faces drawn in marker, clusters of neon Post-its doodled by happy customers. Groups of fashionable Koreans huddle around tricked-out tabletop burners where dishes are cooked and served by the frenetic all-girl staff. No table is without an order of kimbob, large slices of Korean sushi filled with tender curls of spicy octopus, or bulgogi (seasoned beef rib-eye). Kimchi fried rice topped with unorthodox ingredients -- such as melted cheese -- sounds odd, but the first grease-laden bite is revelatory. Korean cold noodle fans should check out the jjol myun, a heaping bowl of rice noodles finished with julienned vegetables and spicy sauce. Order enough food to give reason to linger and let the cheerful spirit soak in.

Tools

18 total results

© 2016 Creative Loafing Atlanta
Powered by Foundation