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Poona Indian Restaurant

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Indian restaurant serving buffet daily, for lunch and dinner. Great selection of desserts.

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You can order chili ($1.49). Chicken wings, too (10 for $4.95). Even a hamburger ($2.75) or a BLT ($1.75). Or the fried catfish specials ($4.99 with two sides). The real surprise: The pork barbecue isn't the best thing here -- the beef barbecue is. Its flavor is deep and dense, with a hauntingly smoky sweetness that lingers in the mouth. A twinge of this quality is present in the Brunswick stew, too, with its chunks of potato and tomato and kernels of corn. The barbecue chicken sandwich is better than any other I've ever had.
Patacon Pisa'o Colombian Restaurant

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Colombian restaurant serving traditional dishes as well as small snacks.
Olde Towne Tavern

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Sports bar/restaurant for locals.

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Nifty little breakfast and lunch place where most things are made to order, unusual for what is basically a meat-and-three. Especially good are the Greek specialties: herbed chicken, stuffed cabbage and vegetable lasagna.

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Super H Mart - Duluth

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Why “H,” you ask? Well, it stands for Han Ah Reum and, no, we don’t know what that means, either. But we certainly know it’s super. This New York-based chain of Korean hypermarts stocks a mind-blowing variety of Asian grocery items — organic produce, Japanese candy, rice wine, unidentifiable squid-based products, tofu, and seaweed out the wazoo. Ever seen a wall of kimchi or wanted to chose between 43 different flavors of soy sauce? Well, you can do so here. There are now three Super Hs in metro Atlanta, but our favorite, the first and hugest store, is in central Gwinnett. It was already clean and inviting, but a recent remodeling has left it even glitzier. In addition to groceries, it has a dizzying range of appliances, a large cosmetics department, cookware, and a vast selection of prepared food. And remember to come hungry so you can enjoy the kick-ass food court.
Haru Ichiban

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Falling in love again with an old favorite restaurant is a beautiful thing. The spark reignited with uni nigiri topped with a raw quail egg, which melted on the tongue like an oceanic creamsicle. Japanese fried chicken arrives on a staggeringly large platter. Bronzed nuggets of chicken have no trace of oiliness, and the marinade imparts slight undertones of soy. Pristine slices of sashimi were soft, with a touch of resistance, and more protein than water. You can order à la carte, but the assortment platter presents a bounty of surprisingly affordable and beautiful seafood. The decor is minimal, but the space always feels like home.
9 total results

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